Photo Essay: The Southwest Indian Art Fair

The Southwest Indian Art Fair is an annual event that acts as both a showcase and market for Indian art on the front lawn of the Arizona State Museum. The festival ran from Feb. 22 to 23, and all photos were shot on Sunday, Feb. 23.

Ruth Teller sits and weaves at the Southwest Indian Art Fair. Teller and her family are known for their traditional Two Grey Hills weaving patterns. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Ruth Teller sits and weaves at the Southwest Indian Art Fair. Teller and her family are known for their traditional Two Grey Hills weaving patterns. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Upton Ethelbah and Lois Welshons discuss their late entry into the art field. Ethelbah began his artwork at age 54 after 28 years of social and educational work. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Upton Ethelbah and Lois Welshons discuss their late entry into the art field. Ethelbah began his artwork at age 54 after 28 years of social and educational work. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Upton Ethelbah and Lois Welshons high five each other after talking about their late entry into their respective fields of art and poetry. Welshons said that she didn't begin writing poetry until she was in her 50s. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Upton Ethelbah and Lois Welshons high five each other after talking about their late entry into their respective fields of art and poetry. Welshons said that she didn’t begin writing poetry until she was in her 50s. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Upton Ethelbah's bronze sculpture, Phantasia, rests under Ethelbah's tent at the Southwest Indian Art Fair. Ethelbah began taking traditional Native American Art classes at Pojoaque Pueblo at the age of 54. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Upton Ethelbah’s bronze sculpture, Phantasia, rests under Ethelbah’s tent. Ethelbah began taking traditional Native American Art classes at Pojoaque Pueblo at the age of 54. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Molly McDonald practices weaving at a stations set up at the Southwest Indian Art Fair. The Fair began in 1993 as a small pottery fair. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Visitor Molly McDonald practices weaving at a stations set up at the fair. The fair began in 1993 as a small pottery fair. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Lynda Teller Pete shows tourist Molly McDonald her weaving process. Teller Pete said that for her, weaving is a way of life. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Lynda Teller Pete shows tourist Molly McDonald her weaving process. Teller Pete said that for her, weaving is a way of life. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Francisco Santiago shows attendees of the Southwest Indian Art Fair how he creates his fabrics. Over 200 artists attended this year's fair. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Francisco Santiago shows attendees how he creates his fabrics. More than 200 artists attended this year’s fair. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Shelden Nuñez-Velarde shows attendees of the Southwest Indian Art Fair how he creates his pottery. Nuñez-Velarde began attending the fair in 2001. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Shelden Nuñez-Velarde, who has been participating in the fair since 2001, shows fair attendees how he creates his pottery. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Shelden Nuñez-Velarde creates a bowl at the Southwest Indian Art Fair. Nuñez-Velarde won first place at the 2009 Southwest Indian Art Market. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Shelden Nuñez-Velarde, who won first place at the 2009 Southwest Indian Art Market, creates a bowl at this year’s festival. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Artist Susan Folwell's piece, Savage Love, on display at the Southwest Indian Art Fair. According to Folwell's website, her art speaks to the contemporary confluence of Indian identity. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
Artist Susan Folwell’s piece, Savage Love, on display. According to Folwell’s website, her art speaks to the contemporary confluence of Indian identity. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)

 

An artist at the Southwest Indian Art Fair carves Navajo flutes. The fair went from Feb. 22 to Feb. 23. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)
An artist at the Southwest Indian Art Fair carves Navajo flutes. (Photograph by Jordan McMahon)

 

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